Category Unified Communications

How Small Collaboration Spaces Deliver Big Results at Work

Sometimes you just need a quick get-together to organize a plan of attack. At other times, you’ll want to gather a few people to work on a project. Or you may need to consult right now with colleagues who are at another location.

What solves the challenges in each of these scenarios? The value of having a small collaboration space where core members of a team can share ideas, work on documents in real time, and connect with colleagues and clients at remote locations. In “Small Spaces, Big Outcomes,” find out why small spaces like huddle rooms have become popular and will continue to be an essential part of the workplace. This guide also explores other benefits of small collaboration spaces, including:

  • Better use of your real estate (large meeting spaces are rarely used to capacity).
  • Attracting and keeping the employees that drive your business success.
  • Efficient use of technology. Equipping a series of small spaces with unified communications technology leads to better collaboration than experienced in large conference rooms.

Technology for Your Small Collaboration Spaces

This guide includes a look at specific Poly technology solutions and their benefits to your workplace collaboration efforts. You’ll get concise explanations of the benefits and features of:

  • Polycom Studio
  • Polycom + HP SRS Bundle
  • CCX Business Media Phones for Microsoft Teams
  • Polycom Trio

You’ll also learn about the advantages you can gain when integrating Polycom room solutions with Alexa for Business.

If you have any questions about what you’ve read, or you’d like to read more content that will help you make an informed decision about improving your workplace with collaboration and AV solutions, we’re here to help. Visit the  AVI-SPL Resources page for more content (you can narrow your results by focusing on technology type, the content format, and vendor partner). 

You can also connect with AVI-SPL via web form by going to the AVI-SPL contact page. Prefer talking to someone? Reach out to AVI-SPL at 866-708-5034.

Get your copy of “Small Spaces, Big Outcomes: Trade Office Spaces for Engaging Collaboration Environments”  >

AVI-SPL Case Study: Supporting Daily Collaboration at Truepoint

For Truepoint’s new headquarters in Cincinnati, AVI-SPL created collaboration spaces that meet the company’s need for seamless interaction among team members and foster a personalized experience between clients and advisors. In this case study on the project, you’ll discover:

  • The kind of collaboration experience Truepoint wanted to create
  • The process of finding the right workplace technology
  • How AVI-SPL turned a “jumble of equipment” across two floors into a streamlined set of solutions

Read the Truepoint case study >

Do you have similar challenges at your company? AVI-SPL can help. Bring us your questions and goals, or call 866-708-5034.

Five Best Practices for Adopting UC and Video

Unified communications and video collaboration tools improve the user experience when they align with business goals AND are used throughout an organization.

But getting people to use these solutions can be a challenge.

AVI-SPL’s Customer Advisory Board, which includes Fortune 500 companies and large enterprises, shared the value of UC and video in their organizations and how they increase user adoption so that the company and its staff reap those benefits. Their advice and recommendations are summarized in a LinkedIn post by AVI-SPL SVP of Marketing Kelly Bousman.

In Kelly’s article, you’ll learn:

  • Why adoption matters and how to measure it
  • Key performance indicators (KPIs) that reflect how often video for collaboration is used in meeting rooms
  • Five best practices for increasing video adoption

Read “Five Best Practices for IT Leaders to Increase Video Adoption” >

 

Workplace Transformation Starts With a Goal

In recent posts, we’ve looked at the value of activity-based work spaces, how to calculate the value of collaboration solutions. We’ve also heard from experts in workplace transformation. In this post, let’s look at ways you can start to channel your efforts for improving the workplace. 

AVI-SPL’s 2019 Concept Catalog offers steps you can take at the beginning of project to improve collaboration in the workplace. Let’s briefly go over some of those points:

  • Assess the state of collaboration. Take an honest assessment of where your organization is with collaboration. Begin by asking employees about their work preferences and where they would like to see changes. Rather than implementing technologies or changing methods piecemeal, you will get a big picture of the kinds of changes you will want to make.
  • Uncover cultural challenges. Learn where the roadblocks to collaboration are within your organization. Outline what you want your collaboration culture to look like and create a plan that includes encouraging openness and rewarding collaborative behaviors.
  • Decide what metrics you will use. You will want to continually evaluate the value and effectiveness of your collaboration solution. To do so, the company needs to first identify and prioritize goals.

After defining these spaces, here are four considerations that can help you determine what type of room would work best in your organization. Those considerations include:

  • Employee work styles
  • Room and device intelligence
  • Management and maintenance
  • Equipment standardization

Each of these tips will bring up more questions, but for now you have an idea of the kind of questions and issues that need to be considered. Ask us anything if you want to dive deeper and go into specifics: sales@avispl.com or 866-559-8197.

Q&A on Flexible Workplaces and the Future of Work

 In the following Q&A with workplace solutions experts Dusty Duistermars, you’ll learn about changes in the workplace: what’s driving those changes and how companies can adapt. Dusty Duistermars is the senior vice president of digital solutions for JLL, which specializes in professional services in real estate.

Interview With Dusty Duistermars

Q: What is the flexible workplace and what makes it so attractive?
Duistermars: Technology — specifically, mobility — has been impacting where and how we work for over two decades. The flexible workplace is simply space that allows employees to work in non-traditional ways, including remote work, co-working and desk sharing/hoteling. Flex space is typically higher-tech enabled, allowing employees to reserve space based on the type of activity they’re performing and only for a limited duration. These activity-based working spaces include a variety of supportive technologies like interactive video conferencing and wireless sharing of content that can be annotated in real time by participants.

We can trace this to a couple of factors: millennials and technology. Millennials have grown up with the technology that allows them to be in touch with one another on a 24/7 basis. So it’s no surprise that they expect the same of their work environment.

Q: Are we at a point where people can say “no thanks” to a company that doesn’t offer them the experience and resources they need?
Duistermars: Absolutely. Due to the overall talent shortages, employees have options. They could also go freelance; we’ll see the gig economy double in the next five years. If employers are not leveraging their space as a differentiator to both retain and attract employees, they will ultimately fail.

Q: What does this shift look like from the company side?
Duistermars: It’s no longer about occupancy, it’s about utilization and productivity.

Q: So instead of permanent assignments to space, assignments to real-time usage?
Duistermars: Right. You might have 200 or more people assigned to a designated area (typically referred to as a ‘neighborhood’) that only has 100 desks, and that will work because they’re not there at the same time.

Q: To do this, don’t you need a culture that welcomes and supports people working in and out of the office?
Duistermars: Yes, and you can build that culture by making collaboration technology systems and spaces available to them. Focus groups, design partners, and IT will help figure out how flexible to go in those areas. They’ll also account for work types, as on-site engineers will require different types of space than say the national sales team who’s rarely at ‘their’ desk. The idea is that more personalization and flexibility add to the employee experience.

Q: Where are companies at with the move to flexible workplaces?
Duistermars: First off, this doesn’t happen overnight. There are multiple steps, including detailed change management and communication strategies that are needed to be successful. That being said, we see, on average, about 5-10% of client portfolios being flexible. It’ll grow to roughly 30% within the next five years.

Q: What will account for that increase?
Duistermars: Talent is driving a lot of this. Millennials want the flexibility. It also a much better cost model for employers. A dedicated space can cost employers on average, $10,000 annually. That’s a lot of money for someone who’s only in their seat about half the time. Thus, desk sharing makes business sense too.

Q: Let’s shift perspective to the IT side. As more spaces become flexible, how does that affect their management?
Duistermars: It makes managing those spaces a challenge if you don’t have the right tools in place. Some platforms are capable of managing numerous aspects of the ecosystem. Or if you’re using a point solution/best in class model, you’ll want to make certain that it’s integrated properly and that you’re getting the right data (typically utilization) out of each system and able to analyze holistically.

Q: How is JLL helping companies that need employees on site?
Duistermars: That’s a great question. Allow me to break this down: First, we involve our consulting and labor analytics group to make certain the company is choosing the right markets/locations based on the type of talent that they need.

From there, we help them create great spaces where employees want to be. We also lean on partners like AVI-SPL to make sure the experience from desk to meeting spaces is frictionless.

Q: What advice do you have for companies that haven’t yet bought into the idea of workplace transformation?
Duistermars: The only constant is change. If you’re not getting ahead of this by focusing on your people and your technology, you won’t need to worry about any of this in five years; your company won’t exist.