Category AVI-SPL

Webinar Recording: Build Your Video Wall With the Right LED Video Technology

If you’ve been confused by the claims about LED displays or just aren’t sure which one is right for your environment, this webinar is available to help. Experts from Christie Digital and AVI-SPL combine their knowledge to provide a brief history of LED technology and steer you toward the solutions that bring the best return on investment for your video walls.

Today, AV integrators deploy LED displays to create seamless video walls that are bright, reduce eye fatigue for viewers (including those in spaces like control rooms), and can handle the load of 24/7 environments.

This webinar, presented by Commercial Integrator and TechDecisions with AVI-SPL and Christie Digital, includes an overview the basics that will empower you to become a smart buyer of video wall solutions for your company. You’ll learn the factors to consider when choosing displays to create a video wall. Related topics include:

  • LED terminology
  • Planning for power and HVAC
  • System-level certifications
  • Figuring our optimal viewing distances
  • Scan rates, refresh rates, brightness, contrast ratio
  • Compositing, windowing, configuration, video switching

You’ll hear from a panel of experts that includes:

  • Martin Waverly, senior manager, Technical Solutions Group, Christie Digital
  • Ted Romanowitz, senior product manager, Christie LED, Christie Digital
  • Carlos Lerma, director of engineering, Control Room Group, AVI-SPL

These experts will explain the advantage of investing in LED display technology while also clearing away the confusion about LED solutions. You’ll learn how LED displays can free up real estate in the spaces where they’ll be deployed, and you’ll get a look at Christie solutions likes its Apex and CorePlus video wall series.

Get the recording for “Understand the LED Video Technology That is Right for Your Applications” >

Webinar Recording: Intersection of AV and ADA Compliance

Access this webcast for a look at the issues you’ll encounter with accessibility and ways you can ensure your AV technology complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act.

When technology solutions don’t follow compliance dictates, they have the potential to create more barriers. For example: a lectern where the AV controls are not accessible to people in wheelchairs or a display that sticks out too far from the wall and becomes a hazard for those with sight disabilities.

In this AVI-SPL webinar, Legrand | AV’s Kathryn Gaskell and Karen Smidt discuss a few sections of the ADA (American With Disabilities Act) most relevant to AV, including:

  • Reach Ranges (section 308)
  • Operable Parts (sections 205 and 209)
  • Protruding Objects (sections 204 and 307)

You’ll gain an understanding of the AV challenges inherent in each section, and learn solutions for creating a more inclusive environment.

Get the recording for “The Intersection of AV Technology and the ADA: Challenges and Solutions” >

About the presenters

Kathryn Gaskell
Director of Product Management – Chief Brand
Legrand | AV
 
Kathryn has worked at Legrand | AV for six years, leading product management for the Chief brand. Her efforts have led to the development of industry-leading display mounting solutions for education and corporate environments, digital signage applications and more. Her interest in ADA was spiked by frequent questions from customers, and a desire to solve their accessibility challenges with practical, well-designed solutions.
 
Karen Smidt
Director of Marketing – Commercial Brands
Legrand | AV
 
Karen began working at Legrand | AV 13 years ago and is currently leading the commercial marketing team in their efforts to provide useful, educational content to our customers and end users. Working with Kathryn to better understand customer questions around ADA, she has developed educational resources to help explain and solve many of the challenges at the intersection of AV and accessibility. 

Five Steps to Planning for a Video Wall

You want to create the perfect video wall, and this webinar explains how to do it. Bo Beard, sales engineer for LG Electronics, explains the factors that end users and integrators need to consider when planning a video wall project. Joining him is Chris Caputo, senior project engineer for AVI-SPL, who offers his expertise in control-room settings.

Bo will also address technology considerations that include:

  • webOS Smart Signage Platform
  • Curveable LAPE LED
  • Ultra-narrow bezel video wall display

You’ll also learn how determine display layout, find and prep the right environment, and choose the products that suit your content.

Get the Recording for “Five Decisions to Make when Planning for a Video Wall” >

How to Promote Video Collaboration in Your Workplace

As we use video conferencing systems more often in the workplace, we are working together to address challenges and complete projects. The use of video conferencing in companies of all types and sizes reflects a need to improve employee engagement and productivity.

To promote video collaboration in your organization, deploy user-friendly video conferencing systems in your meeting rooms. That’s one of the major takeaways from a new paper by Wainhouse Research, “Profiting From a Business Video Culture.” The study notes that end users consider video conferencing in a dedicated room essential to the workplace video experience.

This also holds true for those of you working in mid-market companies, where PC-based collaboration is the most common use of video conferencing. Forty percent of mid-market employees use video conferencing at their desktops on a daily basis. Think that would make room systems unnecessary or unwanted? Think again.

According to Wainhouse, the frequency of use leads to a better impression of video conferencing, with most respondents saying they would participate in it more often if it were available in dedicated rooms. 

Some major takeaways from the Wainhouse report:

  • Among those who attend video calls at least once a week, they prefer dedicated room conferencing over PC-based video calls.
  • The availability of room-based systems makes end users more likely to take part in video conferencing in other venues (huddle rooms, desktop, mobile).
  • Companies of most sizes overwhelmingly prefer video meetings in conference rooms

Room-based video conferencing systems mitigate the background noise and interruptions you have to deal with when taking calls you take at your desk. Other benefits include:

  • Trimming travel costs
  • Enhancing teamwork with internal and external stakeholders (colleagues, clients, customers, partners)
  • Attracting the talent that expects a collaborative culture 

If your company is like others, with a high percentage of PC-based video, you already have a solid foundation on which to build and extend these benefits across your organization. As you do your research and talk with potential service providers, you’ll want to make sure they can provide the same quality of meeting-room video collaboration you’d expect is afforded to the largest companies. That includes a consistent, positive user experience that promotes adoption. The services supporting that quality and your users must be global or nationwide in reach while also addressing the challenges of individual offices and ensuring that all locations are receiving consistent service. 

Read the Wainhouse Research paper as you consider an expansion of video conferencing that would improve productivity, employee engagement, and talent retention at your company. 

Download “Profiting From a Business Video Culture” >

Making AV Tech ADA Compliant in Higher Education

Jay Bosch, a director of business development for AVI-SPL, contributes with this post on ensuring ADA compliance in higher education. Note that AVI-SPL will host a Legrand | AV webinar on AV and ADA compliance on Sept. 4.

Starting an “All Students” approach to ensure ADA compliance in your classroom

Students come to class with a desire to learn. However, sometimes there are challenges that need to be overcome in order for every student to have an equal opportunity to learn.  Employing an “all students” approach to the classroom allows every student to engage with instructors live or via remote means.  Also, classroom design is rapidly changing, and Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance should be considered in all classroom formats. 

As learning environments become more interactive, ADA compliance can provide its own challenges.  Working with a professional audio/visual integration company can ensure your classrooms incorporate every students’ needs.  The education landscape and related technology evolves quickly.  It is important to build flexibility in your investment which includes the latest classroom designs and methods including distance learning, e-learning, hands-on learning, simulation and others. 

Considerations:

  • Competition to maintain and grow student population will increase as on-line offerings become more prevalent. This includes all students.
  • As the general population — including people with disabilities — relies increasingly on mobile devices, teaching will follow this migration and leverage it to better engage “smartphone-centric” students.
  • The pressure to stretch education dollars will likely drive the growth of e-learning, distance education, and any other pedagogical method that is more efficient and cost-effective than traditional classroom-based learning.
  • As all of these advances occur, ADA standards will adapt and expand to ensure that people with disabilities are not left behind.
  • All new buildings and remodels should be designed with ADA compliance as a given, similar to all public restrooms with a wheelchair stall.

What is ADA compliance?

First enacted in 1990 and amended/updated in 2008, the Americans with Disabilities Act is aimed at preventing discrimination against people with mental or physical disabilities. The titles of the ADA that apply to schools are administered by the Department of Justice (DoJ). The DoJ provides informational, regulatory, and enforcement support for the ADA’s requirements.  For the AV industry, the critically important document is the 2010 “ADA Standards for Accessible Design.”  (The ADA sections cited in this Legrand eBook are drawn from that document.) Assembly halls, conference rooms, classrooms, learning spaces, and lecture halls all fall within the ADA’s compliance standards.

Seven commonly recognized components of ADA compliance

  • Policy: Create a policy for electronic and information technology (EIT) accessibility
  • Designate an accessibility coordinator: Appoint an accessibility coordinator
  • Purchasing: Include accessibility criteria in EIT purchases
  • Post your accessibility statement: Include a link to an accessibility statement and resources and provide a feedback mechanism
  • Conduct an audit: Complete a prioritized audit of EIT
  • Fix any issues: Remediate inaccessible EIT
  • Training: Provide role-based training for faculty, staff, and administrators

Next Steps: Capital Requests

  • Logging which ADA standard(s) each requested piece of AV equipment complies with will also form the basis of a searchable ADA compliance database.
  • Having ADA compliance information included in a capital request helps AV designers in assessing whether the overall AV system meets the needs of people with disabilities, in all aspects.
  • Thorough documentation of ADA-compliant AV equipment will be needed in budget meetings, requests for proposals, inquiries and ADA audits.

Five things to consider for lifecycle planning with ADA-compliant equipment

  1. Recording ADA compliance information upfront will streamline any ADA audits that may occur. The necessary data will be a few keystrokes away, saving you time in compiling this information after the fact.
  2. Have ADA compliancy information available during equipment upgrades and replacements, and ensure your purchases are earmarked to be ADA-compliant.
  3. Should new product categories become subject to ADA compliancy standards, a quick search of your database will indicate non-compliant equipment. This data will help you plan for future ADA-compliant purchases and ensure you meet any deadlines set by the Department of Justice.
  4. Document and log compliant equipment with a VPAT (Voluntary Product Accessibility Template) process.  A VPAT is a vendor-generated statement that provides information on how a product or service conforms to the Section 508 Accessibility Standards for Electronic and Information Technology in a consistent fashion and format.
  5. A word to the wise: Be sure to check with your regional ADA Center to see which specific VPAT applies to your project.

ADA Requirements for AV

Many ADA requirements apply to the AV industry. The ADA’s requirements are meant to allow people with disabilities to access and use AV equipment in business and educational settings as easily as people without disabilities. ADA requirements apply whether or not a school receives federal funding. (Schools that receive federal funding also have to comply with another federal law, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.)

For example, teachers in wheelchairs should have access to lecterns set at usable heights, and with sufficient surrounding space for them to maneuver into and out of.  Any AV controls and equipment associated with the lectern should be just as easy for them to access and use.

Fusion Fixed MountAs the term suggests, “ADA compliance” applies to the sum of the combined systems—not just its individual components—and the ways in which it is installed/operated complies with the ADA’s requirements. For example, under ADA rules that govern “Protruding Objects” (ADA Sections 204 and 307), a wall-mounted flat panel display cannot protrude more than four inches from that wall. There’s a good reason for this: An object protruding more than four inches could be a serious obstacle for wheelchair users and people with visual disabilities. While a two-inch-deep mount and 2.25-inch-deep display are ADA compliant on their own, when mounted together, they exceed the depth limit.

AVI-SPL is dedicated to making sure all students have an opportunity to learn, no matter if they are traditional, non-traditional or special needs.  AVI-SPL partners with nationally recognized names such as Chief, Da-Lite, Middle Atlantic, Sennheiser, Spectrum, and Vaddio, who all share our dedication to ADA compliance who provide excellent solutions for visual, auditory and mobility impairment.  Solutions include: wall mounts, swing mounts, height adjustable display mounts, electric height adjust carts, height-adjustable lecterns and desks, ultra low-profile credenzas, screens, speakers and microphones.  See the “Making AV Technology ADA Compliant” document for more information.

Register for our Sept. 4 webinar “The Intersection of AV Technology and the ADA: Challenges and Solutions” >