Category AVI-SPL

Five Steps to an Outstanding Video Conferencing Experience

A big part of the user experience in meeting rooms is the user interface. And by that I just mean the control panel that participants will use to start the meeting, video call, and sharing capabilities. As I’ve learned from AVI-SPL’s programmers, these control panels should support the different ways people want to work in these spaces.

David Thorson, vice president, programming at AVI-SPL, reviews five steps to building a video conferencing user interface (UI) that delivers a positive meeting room user experience (UX) in your digital workplace. Thorson will help you understand issues like:

  • Defining user expectations for the meeting room experience
  • Creating the UX architecture
  • Choosing the right hardware and software based on your user interface blueprint
  • Using meeting room standards for a consistent experience
  • Monitoring the usability of your solution

You’ll also learn about some specific Crestron solutions that help meeting attendees experience an outstanding video conference.

Read “User Experience-Driven Meeting Spaces Meet the User Interface” >

 

How to Create Meeting Room Standards

If you want to encourage effective collaboration within your organization — and who wouldn’t? — then you need to establish standards for your collaboration rooms and the technology within them. “Why is that?” you might ask. Well, in this AVI-SPL white paper, you’ll discover the benefits of creating meeting room standards for your workplace. You’ll also learn:

  • 5 keys to successful collaboration
  • How to choose solutions for different types of rooms
  • How to know if your standards are working

After reading this paper, you’ll understand how to create technology standards for different rooms and how those standards can make your meetings run smoothly. This will lead to a better user experience during collaboration sessions, and your employees will increase their use video collaboration in dedicated spaces.

You’ll also have a concise resource you can go to again and again. This guide includes a table of the common types of meeting rooms and the technology systems that usually go in them.

Get your copy of “The Enterprise Guide to Creating Meeting Room Standards” >

7 Tips for Successful Workplace Meetings in 2020

A new year presents the motivation for resolutions that we hope will improve our lives. Since so much of our time is devoted to our careers, I’m going to focus on a strategy that can lead to a better workplace experience and business success in 2020.

During a 2019 AVI-SPL webinar, Lieven Bertier of Barco explained the ingredients to a perfect workplace meeting and how collaboration technology supports these meetings. Bertier is the director of go-to-market strategy and services for Barco’s meeting experience business.

He noted that Barco’s own research indicates millennials and Gen Z will make up 59% of the workforce this year (a figure not too far off from the 50% figure I found in this source). This matters because they are natural collaborators who embrace digital technology. As I frequently mention in this blog, companies that want to attract and keep the best talent need to give them the tools to succeed.

During the webinar, Bertier touched on stats and findings that illustrate the connection between meetings and meeting-room technology, including:  

  • 30% of organizations in 2020 will find their greatest competitive asset in their workforce’s ability to creatively use digital technologies.
  • 72% of employees say their companies need to invest in better meeting technology (most say it needs to be intuitive and plug-and-play).
  • Most millennials (78%) and everyone else (75%) want a fixed place for their meetings.

That last point should matter to anyone involved in business, because millennials are already the largest segment of the U.S. workforce. (As an aside, be skeptical about reports that claim millennials will make up 75% of the workforce in 2025. Recent research shows that’s an inflated number that keeps getting circulated without fact-checking.)

But of all the statistics that Bertier shared, the number that struck me and inspired this post is this one: 51% of employees attend meetings that they say are irrelevant to them

Let’s give this the context Bertier provided: The average meeting length in the U.S. is 48 minutes. So if you attend 10 meetings a week, that accounts for a full day of work each week. No one who cares about their career and responsibilities wants to be part of a day’s worth of being unproductive. Now consider that there are about 3 billion meetings in the U.S. every year and that the Fortune 500 wastes $75 million a year on meetings. As Bertier notes, it’s no wonder that nearly 60% of employees think meetings should be shorter.

Meetings Aren’t the Problem

The problem is poorly conceived meetings. Meetings should be where people formulate their strategy and tactics, brainstorm ideas, make decisions, work with one another, and make progress on their shared projects. Where time is at a premium, meetings can’t be interrupted by digressions, small talk, and technology that hinders rather than helps. With that in mind, here are Bertier’s list of seven tips for better meetings:

    1. Add the technology and rooms that will empower people to have better, more productive meetings.
      • So what does better technology look like? It’s simple and intuitive. That means it works at the touch of a button, is wireless, compatible with any device, and is easy to set up. 
    2. Reduce the number of meetings. Don’t mistake this for less collaboration. Empowered by meeting spaces with collaboration technology, you may find your employees getting together frequently in quick huddles to review plans of action, answer lingering questions, and map out strategies.
    3. Assign clear roles and responsibilities: A meeting that has a chairperson, note taker, facilitator, and timekeeper can keep it focused and productive.
    4. No interruptions or distractions. Most participants are offended by someone who uses a phone or computer during a meeting. This can be impractical to eliminate, since we rely on our personal devices to take notes and contribute to the discussion. It may be better to encourage attendees to use their devices only for purposes related to the task at hand.
    5. Use multimedia. 72% of survey respondents feel more engaged with multimedia presentations.
    6. Embrace huddle spaces. Huddle spaces with ready-to-use collaboration technology benefit those who want to work together in small groups and do so at a moment’s notice.
    7. Aim for the 17-minute meeting. In countries around the world, most employees want their meetings to be shorter. By setting a time limit on meetings, you encourage organizers and participants to focus on the agenda.

With these tips in mind, you have a good foundation from which to empower staff with the type of meetings that improve productivity, reduce stress, and create a collaborative environment that leads to better business outcomes. For help with putting these recommendations into action, work with a services provider who has deep experience in workplace collaboration. AVI-SPL has that experience, so reach out with your questions and requests.

How to Build Your Company’s Activity-Based Work Spaces

We want flexibility in how and when we work. When we’re at the office, we expect to have the tools to do our jobs efficiently and to the best of our abilities. That sometimes means being able to rely on one another’s knowledge as we work through projects. It also means being able to exchange that knowledge in ways that engage us and feel comfortable.

Activity-Based Work Spaces and the Technology That Supports Them

When you have a variety of activity-based spaces, you enable people to work with one another using tools that facilitate collaboration. And that capability can build a strong team culture. Just a few of the activity-based spaces we find at work include conference rooms, huddle rooms, ideation spaces, and quiet rooms. Depending on their size and purpose, these areas may have solutions like BYOD web conferencing, interactive displays, digital signage, and wireless presentation and content sharing.

In AVI-SPL’s white paper on multigenerational teams, you’ll find a helpful chart that shows how seven types of technology solutions can be applied across seven room types. Here’s a sneak peek:

Activity-based spaces chart

Benefits of Activity-Based Work Spaces

Meetings can be about what has been done, what could have been done better, and planning for upcoming projects. A lot of meetings — perhaps yours as well — follow this format. Activity-based spaces encourage productivity; they are places to do the tasks that are usually on the to-do list following a meeting that’s long on talk and short on action.

And when you have a variety of activity-based spaces, you enable everyone in a workplace to gather in groups, work one-on-one, and alone. Some of their benefits include:

  • Giving different generations the spaces where they feel comfortable working.
  • Encouraging collaboration. Bring people together, and you create a environment for innovation. 
  • Empowering people to be more productive because they have the resources — including colleagues and technology — to work effectively.
  • Attracting and retaining talent. Give people the tools and culture they need to work at their best and grow into their positions, and you’ve created a workplace where people want to be.

Activity-Based Work Spaces Close the Generation Gap

AVI-SPL’s white paper “Building an Inspiring Digital Workplace for Multigenerational Teams” explains the differences in collaboration, communication, and work-space preferences among different generations. And it shows how activity-based spaces meet the needs of boomers, Gen X, millennials, and Gen Z, whether they prefer video conferencing, working face to face, or collaborating in groups.

You’ll learn how you can create a collaborative environment that works for everyone as you gain insight into the kind of work spaces and technology that can bring the generations together and foster teamwork. 

Get your copy of “Build an Inspiring Digital Workplace for Multigenerational Teams” >

How Small Collaboration Spaces Deliver Big Results at Work

Sometimes you just need a quick get-together to organize a plan of attack. At other times, you’ll want to gather a few people to work on a project. Or you may need to consult right now with colleagues who are at another location.

What solves the challenges in each of these scenarios? The value of having a small collaboration space where core members of a team can share ideas, work on documents in real time, and connect with colleagues and clients at remote locations. In “Small Spaces, Big Outcomes,” find out why small spaces like huddle rooms have become popular and will continue to be an essential part of the workplace. This guide also explores other benefits of small collaboration spaces, including:

  • Better use of your real estate (large meeting spaces are rarely used to capacity).
  • Attracting and keeping the employees that drive your business success.
  • Efficient use of technology. Equipping a series of small spaces with unified communications technology leads to better collaboration than experienced in large conference rooms.

Technology for Your Small Collaboration Spaces

This guide includes a look at specific Poly technology solutions and their benefits to your workplace collaboration efforts. You’ll get concise explanations of the benefits and features of:

  • Polycom Studio
  • Polycom + HP SRS Bundle
  • CCX Business Media Phones for Microsoft Teams
  • Polycom Trio

You’ll also learn about the advantages you can gain when integrating Polycom room solutions with Alexa for Business.

If you have any questions about what you’ve read, or you’d like to read more content that will help you make an informed decision about improving your workplace with collaboration and AV solutions, we’re here to help. Visit the  AVI-SPL Resources page for more content (you can narrow your results by focusing on technology type, the content format, and vendor partner). 

You can also connect with AVI-SPL via web form by going to the AVI-SPL contact page. Prefer talking to someone? Reach out to AVI-SPL at 866-708-5034.

Get your copy of “Small Spaces, Big Outcomes: Trade Office Spaces for Engaging Collaboration Environments”  >