Category video displays

Video Over IP — How It’s Done

In a previous post, you learned why video over IP makes sense. Now we’ll look at how to make it happen.

First, let’s define a couple of terms:

  • Encoding: When you encode data, you’re making it suitable for transmission over an Ethernet network. So an encoder distributes high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In can be HDMI, and Video Out is Ethernet. An example of an encoder is Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR.
  • Decoding: As you’d expect, this means you’re making the signal suitable for an uncompressed HDMI transmission. So a decoder receives high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In is an Ethernet stream, and Video Out can be HDMI. An example of a decoder is the Crestron DM-RMC-100-STR.

In a point-to-point network, you can send a signal from a computer over your LAN to a display in another room. Both areas can have Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR, and they don’t need a matrix switcher. You can also multicast from a single encoder that sends signals to each room that has a decoder and display.

You can also use those rooms as collaboration spaces, where you connect your computer so that your content appears on the display. The Crestron DGE-100 has the ability to receive the LAN stream, and also can take a local connection from a laptop. Watch this Crestron video to see how easy it is to create a network AV solution.

The Ease and Benefits of Video Over IP

A recent Crestron video shows why sending your organization’s video signals over IP makes sense. It also shows how surprisingly easy it is.

  • No distance limitations — Using the Ethernet, you’re sending those video signals across buildings, campuses, and geographic distances. So that ambitious plan you have to distribute digital signage and IPTV isn’t quite as daunting as initially thought.
  • Use your existing network infrastructure — You don’t need a new, dedicated AV network to carry this data. Choosing that path will not save you money over the traditional copper or fiber solution. Plus, you want to be able to mix copper, fiber and network AV on the same platform.
  • Scalability —  You buy the encoder/decoder you need, drop it on the network, and add more units at any time. That’s what I mean by easy.  In today’s ecosystem of BYOD, that expandability is essential to keep everyone in a growing company connected and empowered to use their own devices.

With video over IP, you don’t need to buy a matrix switcher to share the same content on displays in different rooms. In my next post, I’ll look at some of the specific Crestron solutions that can create the system you need to send and receive video over the network anywhere, and we’ll define encoders and decoders. In the meantime, watch the Crestron video below that inspired this post.

Webinar: Display Technology for Higher Education Recruitment

Concerned about recruiting students to your university? Then join AVI-SPL and Christie on Wednesday, August 17 at 1 p.m. EST for a webinar that explains how display and video wall technology can enhance the student experience and bring a wow factor to your higher ed campus.

Register for “Display Technology That Attracts Students to Your Higher Ed Campus” >

About the Presenter

Bill Copley, a senior member of the Christie sales team since 2009, brings 25+ years of experience in the IT software industry, with 15 of those years in the AV industry. Bill collaborates on the direction of sales and product management. He also provides guidance to other sales team members in generating new business and deepening existing business relationships.

Canon Projectors Win Twice at InfoComm

Canon doubled up on projector awards while at the annual InfoComm trade show last week. Industry publication AV Technology named Canon’s REALiS 4K500ST projector as one of its Best of Show winners.

Systems Contractor News named Canon’s REALiS WUX500 projector as its Most Innovative Video Display Product.

REALiS 4K500ST features include:

  • LCoS technology with AISYS enhancement
  • 5,000 lumens
  • Short throw
  • True 4K

REALiS WUX500 features:

  • LCoS with Canon lens
  • 5,000 lumens
  • Constant brightness
  • Native widescreen resolution – 1920 x 1200
  • DICOM simulation mode (D model)

Order the REALiS 4K500ST, the REALiS WUX500 and WUX500 D (DICOM compliant) at AVI-SPL’s Canon product page.

See Sony’s New Display Technology at InfoComm 2016

One of the many cool stops along AVI-SPL’s Guided Technology Tour at InfoComm 2016 is the Sony booth. In reading the description of what Sony plans to showcase, I noted its reference to “giant canvas technology.”

Curious, I dug a little deeper and found a recent Sony blog post on its new high-end visual display technology. The power behind this display is Crystal LED Integrated Structure (CLEDIS™), which combines ultrafine LEDs into what Sony calls a “unique surface mounting structure.” From that surface, each tiny pixel (just 0.003mm-squared) emits its own light, while the rest of the surface area remains black.

The result is a high-contrast ratio across a wide canvas, and efficient use of light energy. You can combine the individual display units with no bezels to create a seamless, large-scale set of visuals.

Sony is showing this technology to the public for the first time at InfoComm 2016 in Las Vegas this June 8-10. And you can get a personalized look at it when you sign up for AVI-SPL’s Guided Technology Tour. We’re hosting three tours twice each over the course of the three-day exhibit, and Sony is one of our stops. So click the link above to sign up and see what Sony and a host of other leaders in audio, visual, and collaboration systems have in store for professional organizations of all types.