Category video displays

Webinar: Virtual Reality and Large Displays in Higher Education

Learn about the large-format displays and virtual reality technology that Samsung offers to support collaboration and learning in the higher education classroom. Shari Sentlowitz, Samsung’s senior manager of education solutions, shares the criteria you should consider when adding collaboration technology to the classroom.

Download the recording for “Virtual Reality and Large Displays in Higher Education” >

Webinar Recording: Classroom Collaboration

Experts from Milestone and Sharp look at how distance learning has changed education, and the classroom tools each company provides to encourage collaboration among teachers and students.

George Atsidakos of Milestone will look at Chief and Da-Lite products, including the IDEA screen, which is a projection screen and writeable board that holds up to daily use.

Gary Bailer of Sharp follows with an overview of the effects of distance learning, and the benefits of interactive collaboration in education. He then focuses on the Sharp Aquos Board, the award-winning, interactive display that allows students in the same room and from different locations to collaborate with each other.

Download the webinar “Interactivity in the Classroom” >

5 Ideas for Display Technology in Higher Education

In this AVI-SPL eBook, created in consultation with Christie Digital, we look at five uses for advanced display technology in the university setting, and why each one matters. The benefits this illustrated paper explores include:

  • Building a student community
  • Research and innovation
  • Collaborative and interactive learning
  • Development of job skills
  • Sharing eye-catching visuals

We also offer advice on what to consider and look for when purchasing display technology for your higher education campus. And we link to our recent webinar with Christie on display technology for higher ed, with plenty of real-world examples for inspiration.

Download your copy of “5 Creative Use Cases for Display Technology in Higher Education” >

Video Over IP — How It’s Done

In a previous post, you learned why video over IP makes sense. Now we’ll look at how to make it happen.

First, let’s define a couple of terms:

  • Encoding: When you encode data, you’re making it suitable for transmission over an Ethernet network. So an encoder distributes high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In can be HDMI, and Video Out is Ethernet. An example of an encoder is Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR.
  • Decoding: As you’d expect, this means you’re making the signal suitable for an uncompressed HDMI transmission. So a decoder receives high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In is an Ethernet stream, and Video Out can be HDMI. An example of a decoder is the Crestron DM-RMC-100-STR.

In a point-to-point network, you can send a signal from a computer over your LAN to a display in another room. Both areas can have Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR, and they don’t need a matrix switcher. You can also multicast from a single encoder that sends signals to each room that has a decoder and display.

You can also use those rooms as collaboration spaces, where you connect your computer so that your content appears on the display. The Crestron DGE-100 has the ability to receive the LAN stream, and also can take a local connection from a laptop. Watch this Crestron video to see how easy it is to create a network AV solution.

The Ease and Benefits of Video Over IP

A recent Crestron video shows why sending your organization’s video signals over IP makes sense. It also shows how surprisingly easy it is.

  • No distance limitations — Using the Ethernet, you’re sending those video signals across buildings, campuses, and geographic distances. So that ambitious plan you have to distribute digital signage and IPTV isn’t quite as daunting as initially thought.
  • Use your existing network infrastructure — You don’t need a new, dedicated AV network to carry this data. Choosing that path will not save you money over the traditional copper or fiber solution. Plus, you want to be able to mix copper, fiber and network AV on the same platform.
  • Scalability —  You buy the encoder/decoder you need, drop it on the network, and add more units at any time. That’s what I mean by easy.  In today’s ecosystem of BYOD, that expandability is essential to keep everyone in a growing company connected and empowered to use their own devices.

With video over IP, you don’t need to buy a matrix switcher to share the same content on displays in different rooms. In my next post, I’ll look at some of the specific Crestron solutions that can create the system you need to send and receive video over the network anywhere, and we’ll define encoders and decoders. In the meantime, watch the Crestron video below that inspired this post.