Category Control systems

The Managed Services Platform for Your Control Room

The well-designed control room is the result of expertise in video display hardware, software controls, and the streamlined user experience that come together to provide the most optimal situational awareness and reliability. It also comes from working closely with our clients so that they have the functionality that works exactly as they expect. AVI-SPL’s Control Room Group (CRG) delivers that expertise for all types of organizations around the world, including departments of transportation, military operations, energy utilities, and emergency management centers.

With the release of Unify ME™ Symphony 4.1, which is the platform at the heart of AVI-SPL’s managed services, CRG offers a support resource for taking a proactive approach to maintaining and servicing your mission critical systems. Benefits include:

  • Reducing the client’s cost of system maintenance for large, complex video wall installations
  • Reducing and/ or preventing system downtime through proactive monitoring of system components

Because control rooms vary in security protocols, Unify ME Symphony adapts to each environment’s needs and collects the data that lets staff know their systems are running efficiently and where it can be improved for better performance. Whether Symphony is used as part of AVI-SPL’s on-premise or off-premise managed services, it complements the CRG designed and integrated system along with its 24/7 customer support services to produce better business outcomes and a better user experience.

Connect with the Control Room Group at 888-619-9083.

 

 

Webinar Recording: Enterprise Collaboration With SMART Technologies and HARMAN Professional

Presenters from HARMAN Professional and SMART Technologies team up for this look at solutions designed for today’s workplace meeting spaces. In the HARMAN session, Paul Krizan covers the AMX Acendo meeting-space solutions, including:

  • Acendo Vibe (compact solution for presenting and sharing audio and video)
  • Acendo Core (an intuitive one-click interface for users to easily start their meetings with Skype for Business integration)
  • Acendo Book (schedule a room through a booking panel that connects to Office 365)
  • Trends in huddle spaces (including technology expectations)
  • How Millennials and real estate costs are affecting the workplace

Stephen Yao of SMART Technologies looks at its interactive displays for the enterprise, including the 2000, 6000, and 7000 Pro series. For each of these models, Stephen covers:

  • Where these solutions are best used
  • HyPr technology (for smooth, precision writing)
  • Ability to preview different inputs
  • Exclusive iQ technology
  • The number of licenses included with these solutions (and their value)

Paul and Stephen also answer many technical questions from the live attendees.

Download “Enterprise Collaboration With HARMAN and SMART Technologies” >

 

Reflecting on AVI-SPL’s Control Room Group at 15

This guest post is written by Brad Herrick, vice president of the AVI-SPL Control Room Group.

The AVI-SPL Control Room Group (CRG) got its start 15 years ago with the Florida Department of Transportation by designing, implementing, and servicing its traffic management center system.

Over the course of those 15 years, CRG has built a team of dedicated professionals focused solely on support of these special systems. It is truly an honor that our customers choose to place their trust in us year over year; we thank them dearly.

Today, the Florida DOT is still our customer, and along the way we’ve provided solutions to other customers’ critical missions — whether for a utility that powers our country’s most critical infrastructure, protecting financial institutions from security and cyber threats, mission support for military operations, or public emergency management.

CRG has grown to become a noted leader in control room integrations, service, and thought leadership, with just a few examples below:

We are on pace for record-breaking revenue for the third year in a row. That kind of growth happens when you give customers the quality they expect and deserve. So that we can continue to grow and better serve our customers, we are recruiting top talent, along with staying on the cutting edge of industry trends like Direct View LED, digital KVM, CAVE, virtual reality and proactive service solutions like AVI-SPL’s Unify ME™ Symphony platform.

See more examples of our work and how we can help your organization when you read through the CRG brochure.

An Internet of Things That Helps Companies

This is the second of two posts in which David Thorson takes a look at standardization and the Internet of Things (IoT). David is AVI-SPL’s senior manager for programming architecture. Read part one here.

With the AV/IT “convergence” well behind the industry at this point, we are on to the next buzzword: “IoT,” otherwise known as the Internet of Things. So where does programming fit into IoT? Some manufacturers are positioning themselves as an IoT provider. Using human interaction, technology and hardware, and data, they provide an entire ecosystem focused on productivity, collaboration, and automation. Others are using sensors and data to drive interactive media into retail signage and extending other types of embedded systems such as smart buildings, security systems and other sub systems.

Just because we call something IoT does not make it so. Limiting the discussion to the traditional approach of the AV industry will only allow it to be part of a bigger IoT solution or remain isolated from the rest of connected systems. For example, if we consider scheduling a meeting and walking into a conference room to share a presentation from a mobile device, we are not seeing the larger picture of an internet of things.

A few manufacturers provide a complete IoT practice to support a customer end to end. Meaning the solution reaches outside the owners’ systems and into their customers’ environment. HARMAN Connected (IoT) Services and Cisco IoT Solutions are two examples of this extension. A full-on IoT solution will connect many different workflows, processes, and data sources. A rich IoT solution may capture data from sensors, people or systems to connect a business’s customers closer to companies providing a product or solution.

Think of it this way: Does the IoT solution save the customer money or make the owner money? The solution that is forward facing for our customers — making money — will have the biggest growth potential and provide for much more dynamic and custom solutions.

Implementing connected systems, sensors, applications, data, and people requires a company culture that is willing to experiment and commit to a mindset. A system expansive enough to be a true IoT solution is a custom IT solution and not a standard out-of-the-box device or software platform.

Here is how the Internet Society defines the different types of IoT communication:

  1. Device-To-Device Communications. This is what the AV industry’s has been doing for decades. Embedded systems is all about monitoring device communications and machine state to provide a level of automation.
  2. Device-To-Cloud Communications. This is relatively new for the AV industry and we’re seeing more and more manufacturers provide this type of solution. Integrators are also providing cloud services and monitoring. See AVI-SPL’s Symphony Platform, including our video from InfoComm.
  3. Device-to-Gateway Model. This is an area where we will see more interoperability between hardware sensors and devices.
  4. Back-End Data-Sharing Model. One of the top achievements of the IoT will be the knowledge that comes from sharing data to improve the delivery of technology.

Try to keep an eye on trends outside the AV world for where technology is headed. Keeping up with coming trends will ensure the industry remains relevant as hardware becomes more agnostic to solutions, and software applications and services become more advanced.

For an in-depth review of the IoT check out:
· 2015 – The Internet of Things (IoT): An Overview
· 2014 – EUROPEAN RESEARCH CLUSTER ON The Internet of Things

One box to rule them all. Then what?

This is part one of two posts in which David Thorson takes a thoughtful look at issues related to standardization and the Internet of Things. David is AVI-SPL’s senior manager for programming architecture.

Hardware assimilation and what the future may hold for the “AV” Industry

Some thoughts inspired by InfoComm 2016

The industry trend of assimilation continues and is picking up speed. We are witnessing this again and again as more features are embedded into a single device and manufacturers compete to provide a breadth of technology. One of the driving factors behind this trend starts with the technology sourced by manufacturers to build their products. (See “One chip to rule them all.”) So what will the industry look like when hardware becomes commonplace and the installation is down to a few devices? Software and application interoperability will be where specialization and ingenuity thrive.

Look no further than the iPhone as an example of where the industry is headed. The chips shrunk, more features were crammed into one device, and everyone started saying “there’s an APP for that.”

Here are some examples of industry trends fueling this assimilation:

The IT fellowship of the AV industry often views the standardized approach to technology at the protocol and hardware level. Adoption of standards at the hardware level and aligning with a smaller number of vendors will improve standardization from a design perspective. But whether that will that improve the experience of end users, I’m not so sure. Think about your personal experience with a typical information technology group. Do you have a lot of options and rich features to choose from? Likely not. We are in the midst of such a rapid growth of collaborative technology and software that it’s challenging for most businesses to keep pace with providing standards and approved solutions to their workforce.

When evaluating technology, it’s important to consider the end user experience as early as possible. An installed solution that allows for customization at the application level will allow for the richest and most intuitive experience.

In my next post, I’ll look at one of the main topics at last week’s InfoComm: the Internet of Things (IoT) and what it means for AV programmers and the customers we serve.