Category AV Everywhere

The Meeting Rooms Your Employees Want

The meeting that wastes everybody’s time is a bane of the workplace and your colleagues. You want these sessions to be productive so you can knock tasks off the to-do list. The right technology can make it possible. In this brief article, learn about the features that can improve your meetings and collaboration sessions, including:

  • Simple connectivity between personal devices and meeting-room displays
  • Content sharing
  • Annotation capabilities

This is the third AVI-SPL article on meeting-room collaboration written in consultation with visual tech manufacturer Christie. The previous two in this series cover multi-site collaboration and AV quality.

Read “How to Create Meeting Rooms That Work the Way Your Employees Do” >

Collaborate and Share Content Between Multi-Site Teams

If content-sharing and collaboration for your colleagues isn’t as is easy at it should be, this resource is for you.

This AVI-SPL article, written with input from visual tech manufacturer Christie, looks at what you should expect from presentation solutions built for the enterprise. Whether your business is small or large, the features you want will likely be the same:

  • Device support
  • Security
  • Annotation capabilities
  • Wireless connection

Read this article on what to look for in a content-sharing and presentation solution >

Overcoming Poor AV in the Meeting

When you’re collaborating with people in remote locations, the meeting is only as good as the audio and video powering it.

This AVI-SPL article offers tips for a good meeting experience, addressing audio, video, and presentations. It also looks at the Christie Brio, a device that allows you to share content from a personal device with in-room participants and those joining from remote locations.

Read “How to Overcome Poor Audiovisual Quality and Improve Group Work” >

Codecs, Bandwidth, and Latency

In our Video Over IP post, we touched on the encoding and decoding process that makes it possible to send video signals over the network. Now let’s take a brief overview of the codecs — which are encoding and decoding protocols — that employ these processes.

Codecs that use about 10Mbps (megabits per second) are ideal for transporting networked AV since they won’t allow the signals to monopolize your network.  Conversely, a 10Gbps (gigabits per second) codec will use up all the available bandwidth on a 10-gigabit network link. On the plus side, the latency — the delay caused by the process of encoding and decoding a video signal — will be low for this bandwidth-heavy codec.

Mezzanine, Intra-frame, and Inter-frame

Mezzanine, intra-frame, and inter-frame codecs will look at the source signal in different ways before compressing it for transmission. You want to have the most bandwidth-efficient codecs handling your signals. Even though there will be a trade-off in latency, that trade-off can be acceptable.

  • Mezzanine: These include TICO and DSC compression codecs. Latency is very low, but they also use the most bandwidth.
  • Intra-frame: These are JPEG2000 and VC-2 codecs. More efficient than Mezzanine in terms of bandwidth, but unable to stream to laptops and mobile devices.
  • Inter-frame: H.264 and H.265. H.264 AVC is the most common codec in use today. H.265 HEVC is the next generation. Latency will be about 200ms in the best case, which is considered acceptable.

Crestron’s “State of Networked Video and Integrated System Design” offers an easy-to-understand overview of these codec types, and the areas you need to address to have an integrated system of video distribution and devices — including network management, control, and security.

Download Crestron’s paper “The State of Networked Video and Integrated System Design” >

5 Ideas for Display Technology in Higher Education

In this AVI-SPL eBook, created in consultation with Christie Digital, we look at five uses for advanced display technology in the university setting, and why each one matters. The benefits this illustrated paper explores include:

  • Building a student community
  • Research and innovation
  • Collaborative and interactive learning
  • Development of job skills
  • Sharing eye-catching visuals

We also offer advice on what to consider and look for when purchasing display technology for your higher education campus. And we link to our recent webinar with Christie on display technology for higher ed, with plenty of real-world examples for inspiration.

Download your copy of “5 Creative Use Cases for Display Technology in Higher Education” >