Video Over IP — How It’s Done

In a previous┬ápost, you learned why video over IP makes sense. Now we’ll look at how to make it happen.

First, let’s define a couple of terms:

  • Encoding: When you encode data, you’re making it suitable for transmission over an Ethernet network. So an encoder distributes high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In can be HDMI, and Video Out is Ethernet. An example of an encoder is Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR.
  • Decoding: As you’d expect, this means you’re making the signal suitable for an uncompressed HDMI transmission. So a decoder receives high-definition AV signals over an IP network. Video In is an Ethernet stream, and Video Out can be HDMI. An example of a decoder is the Crestron DM-RMC-100-STR.

In a point-to-point network, you can send a signal from a computer over your LAN to a display in another room. Both areas can have Crestron’s DM-TXRX-100-STR, and they don’t need a matrix switcher. You can also multicast from a single encoder that sends signals to each room that has a decoder and display.

You can also use those rooms as collaboration spaces, where you connect your computer so that your content appears on the display. The Crestron DGE-100 has the ability to receive the LAN stream, and also can take a local connection from a laptop. Watch this Crestron video to see how easy it is to create a network AV solution.

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